Common Furniture Beetle

This 'Woodworm' is the most common cause of insect attack of softwoods in buildings, often found in structural timbers, roofs, floors and joists. The female adult beetle lays eggs on the susceptible timbers. These hatch into larvae, which burrow into the timber, progressively weakening it. This stage lasts at least three years, and when fully grown, larvae are 2.5mm (1/10"long). Adult beetles emerge from timber, at the completion of the pupal stage, through a 2mm (1/16") diameter flight (exit) hole.


Common Furniture Beetle

Deathwatch Beetle

Causes deterioration of structural hardwoods, e.g. oak, elm and chestnut, already partly decayed by wet rot. This is a pest of larger dimension timbers in older buildings. Occurs predominantly in Southern and Central areas of England and Wales. Has not been recorded in Scotland, is and rarely found in the Island


Deathwatch Beetle

Wood Boring Weevils

Commonly found attacking partly decayed wood. Both adults and larvae cause the breakdown of the wood by burrowing, principally along the grain, Leaving paper thin walls of wood separating the borings. Flight holes are ragged in outline, and less than 2.5mm (1/10") in diameter. After the Furniture Beetle probably the most common timber pest.


Wood Boring Weevils